Baby Boomer Ponders the obsession with body hair removal

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What is the obsession these days with the removal of body hair? I mean, what is it like to paint with thick eyebrows, excruciatingly painful epilations and fake-looking hair extensions?

This baby boomer must feel my age because I do not understand.

Yes, I shave my legs, but I can not help but notice that women are too worried about hair lately. Were we women in this obsession with merchants?

According to the book, Plucked: A History of Hair Removal, over 99% of American women remove their hair.

Interestingly, Gillette introduced the first razor for women in 1915 with the message that body hair was "unsightly" and "objectionable" and so had to be removed. And they just had the perfect tool. The company now earns more than $ 9 billion a year in sales.

The Brazilian Bikini Wax was created in Manhattan by seven Brazilian sisters in the early 1990s, who now earn six million dollars a year through waxing, hair and nails .

People take advantage of this obsession to remove hair. Not only do women wax their legs and armpits, but suddenly, it has become imperative and always fashionable to wax in other places. I mean, OUCH! When did hot wax tear off sensitive areas become stronger?

In fact, women spend about $ 10,000 and the equivalent of more than four months of their life removing hair. Those who wax once or twice a month will spend an average of $ 23,000 in their lifetime.

Really ladies?

Does this sound a little strange to baby boomers who fought for the feminist revolution with the belief that instead of being obsessed with physical beauty, women should focus on their intelligence. careers, achievements and make a difference? During the 60s and 70s, women felt free to make their own decisions regarding hair removal and many chose to go natural. These days, women feel ashamed and somehow dirty without a bikini wax. What happened?

To not look old fashioned, but are there not more important things to think about and do than obsess and spend time and money for to remove the hair? In ancient times (agree, now I look old) people seemed more focused on spiritual matters and family. They did not spend all their time worrying about whether their armpits were well polished. And many would have given $ 150 for a complete body wax – to remove hair that will grow back very quickly – for a good cause.

And while we are discussing it, when did women become so helpless? Have you noticed that baby boomers do not know how to tear their own eyebrows, shave their legs or paint their nails and toenails? In addition to all the money spent on waxing, women spend about $ 1,300 a year to handle and cycle alone. Yes, I splurge once in a while to make my nails, but it's not rocket science to apply nail polish. Would not you rather go on a trip with all that money?

We baby boomers did not go to the hair salon for a "blow-dry". Instead, I wisely handled my own blow dryer like a pro and stuck teeth in the hot rollers without burning my fingertips to look like Farrah. If we wanted our hair to be colored, we took a bottle of Clairol at the pharmacy. We even dared to swap our own hair! Yes, we looked like poodles but who cared? And give me a break. At least we did not look like a Dr. Seuss book with colorful rainbow hair! What is this crazy trend?

When women are not busy trying to remove each piece of hair from their body, they cut or tap on hair extensions to look like a real housewife or woman. one of the Kardashians. Some women become addicted to the more permanent type of extensions that leaves the natural hair looking like a war zone. Did I mention the pain of tearing the ribbon of the type of extensions more permanent? The possibility of bald spots? Does this sound like a good idea? Even Jennifer Aniston admitted that her famous locks had become thin because of the extensions.

Okay, I must confess that in the '60s, it was popular for frozen hair. For those of you who do not remember, this process involved an airtight rubber stopper with tons of small holes. A small metal crochet needle was then used to pull pieces of hair through the holes – one at a time. So it was a bit crooked and women may have lost some of their hair in the process. And we, baby boomers, will not talk about hair-haired women who slept or teased their hair until they looked like a bird's nest. The women combed their hair until they looked like Marge Simpson and then applied enough hairspray to make the hair crisp.

But it was different. Kind of. Why do not we change the subject?

Can we talk for a minute about these disjointed eyebrows, considered the "power front"? These trendier eyebrows are supposed to look like works of art, but they seem ridiculous to me. The dark eyebrows create these squared but perfectly arched eyebrows that look all but natural. I have nothing against eyebrows, but would these two bows on your forehead deserve just as much attention, work and cost? And why depilate your eyebrows if you only remove them again? I am so confused.

Okay, maybe I should not be too critical. My main image shows thin, arched eyebrows that may be a little over-plucked. In fact, I can not believe I was walking so proudly, but it's out of place. At least I picked them proudly alone and it did not cost me a penny!

However, all this cultural phenomenon puzzles me. But wait a minute. Maybe underarm hair is making a comeback. There is an Instagram account called Lady Pit Hair that features women who go against the standards of social beauty and who grow their underarm hair and color them brightly.

"Today's beauty standards really hurt me as they continually monitor women's bodies," says Taylor Carpenter, a 23-year-old woman whose pink pits appear on the page. Besides the issue of revolt against the norms of society forces us women, she has another reason to brighten the color of her hair: "Honestly, I like their appearance, when I spot a look from my pink pits, that makes me smile. "

Well, I kinda like the feeling of getting up against this cloud of disgust for any piece of unpolished hair, but I'm still mystified. Is fluorescent green hair the next trend? Maybe I'm getting old!

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